The Calliphon Mystery …

Between 1953 and 1969 Calvin Wells wrote numerous columns for the Eastern Daily Press under the nom de plume ‘Calliphon’. Wells was a well-known physician of high social standing in East Anglia and it is possible he found greater freedom of expression writing through a pseudonym. Although many readers wrote letters of enquiry, Calliphon never […]

via Calliphon. — Putting Flesh on the Bones

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Work with us!: Vacancy for a Project Conservator

We’re looking for a Conservator to join the Putting Flesh on the Bones Project Team.

The post of Project Conservator is central to the delivery of the project, which aims to make the hidden and scattered Calvin Wells Archive fully available to the public.  Funded by a Wellcome Trust Research Resources grant, PFOTB is a collaboration between Special Collections and the Biological Anthropology Research Centre (BARC) at the University of Bradford.

Discover more about Dr Wells and his work via the Putting Flesh on the Bones project blog.

The Conservator will take the lead on all aspects of collections care within the project, including repairs, remedial conservation, secondary packaging and digitisation preparation activities.  There will also be the opportunity to help improve collections care throughout the Special Collections service.

We are looking for a qualified conservator with specialist knowledge and work-based experience relevant to the project.  They will also need excellent communication skills and be able to manage their own workload.  More about the role and our requirements on the University’s job website.

Post reference: HR0048513.

The post is part-time for 12 months.

Closing date: 1 November 2017.

Rediscover the Inspector online

Studying An Inspector Calls?  We are proud to have assisted the British Library in creating a fantastic new archive-based resource to help GCSE and A-level students, undergraduates and other learners enjoy and understand this work.

PRI 9_1_7 An Inspector Calls Moscow USSR poster

Poster for the first production of An Inspector Calls, in the USSR (archive reference PRI 9/1/7).

The resource, the Discovering Literature website, aims to set the Inspector and other great works of literature in their cultural, social and political contexts.  Two new articles, specially commissioned for this project, explain the story and influence of An Inspector Calls:

Journalist and author Chris Power explores the meaning and structure of the play in his Introduction.  He memorably describes AIC as a  “a morality play disguised as a detective thriller” in which all the characters turn out to be guilty: guilty of selfishness, hypocrisy and callousness.

Special Collections Librarian Alison Cullingford contributed an article reflecting on the ways in which Priestley’s  Bradford childhood and experiences in both World Wars shaped his political thinking and fuelled the anger and urgency that drive An Inspector Calls.

Both articles are extensively illustrated with high quality images from our Priestley archive and other collections, many made available online for the first time.

Do let us know if you find the material helpful in your study or teaching.  We like feedback!

So, what is a palaeopathologist?

We’ve been asked this question several times over the last week or so.  Why?  The University of Bradford has been in the news with an archives project that is fascinating journalists, academics, and members of the public.  The project, ‘Putting Flesh on the Bones‘, is a Wellcome-funded joint endeavour between Special Collections the School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences at the University of Bradford.

male and female brow images m7

We are investigating the life and work of, yes, a palaeopathologist,   Dr Calvin Wells.  A palaeopathologist is a scientist who studies ancient pathologies (injuries, disease).  Dr Wells was a pioneer in this discipline, reporting on skeletal finds from many archaeological sites.  The people whose remains he studied led often difficult, violent and painful lives – all shown in the growth of and damage to the bones.

Coverage so far includes:

There will be much more to discover as we delve deeper into this rich archive.  Keep in touch with project developments via the project blog.

Our Archaeological Sciences colleagues are expert palaeopathologists, using old and new techniques to unlock the secrets of the bones.  Which brings me to the pleasant task of welcoming a new colleague, our Project Osteologist, Michelle Williams-Ward.  Michelle is working on burials in medieval Norfolk for her PhD student at the University. Her project role involves making sense of the many images of bones in the archive.  This requires considerable expertise.  Michelle’s insights have already proved most helpful!

A Blog of Bones

Discover a world of bones, bodies and diseases in our new blog, created by Project Archivist James Neill …

calvin-wells-m110 cr

‘Putting Flesh on the Bones’ is a collaboration between the University of Bradford’s Special Collections and Biological Anthropology Research Centre (BARC). With generous support from the Wellcome Trust, the project will undertake the cataloguing, digitisation and promotion of the Calvin Wells Archive Collection. It is intended that the collection will become a valuable resource for […]

via An Introduction — Putting Flesh on the Bones

Welcome to our new Archivist!

Meet James Neill, who has just joined Special Collections as Project Archivist.

James

James will be with us for 18 months, working on the Wellcome-funded ‘Putting Flesh on the Bones Project’, a collaboration between Special Collections and Archaeological Sciences.  Working closely with the rest of the project team, James will be cataloguing, digitising, preserving, and promoting the rich and unique archive of pioneering palaeopathologist Dr Calvin Wells.  He will be based in Richmond Building but will also be seen around Special Collections.

James received his archive qualification from the University of Glasgow in 2013.  Since then he has worked for all kinds of arts, heritage and academic organisations,  including the Mercers’ Company, London Metropolitan Archives and the University of Arts London, and on collections ranging from the Estate Papers of Sir Richard Whittington to the counter-cultural comic books of Robert Crumb.  This wide experience will be very helpful in navigating the complications of the Wells material!  Find out more about him on his staff webpage.

Bye Bye Lift

As in most university libraries, summer is the time for building works and stock moves in the J.B. Priestley Library.  The major project this year is the replacement of our antiquated and unreliable passenger lift with a modern and more robust unit.  Hooray!

UniB25

J.B. Priestley Library and ‘Commie’ Building under construction, 1970s (UNI B25)

The works mean taking the lift out of action from 12 June 2017.  We anticipate it being unavailable for much of the summer.   Visitors who have mobility difficulties should let us know so we can make alternative arrangements for them.

Keep up with the lift’s progress and our other building projects via posts on this blog, our Building Works web page, and our Twitter account.