Collections of the Month: Poems in the Reading Room

For National Poetry Day (6 October), some poetic links for Special Collections at the University of Bradford. The poets whose work we hold were inspired by the wider themes gathered by Special Collections, such as Yorkshire scenery, anti-nuclear campaigning, and archaeology.

Title page of Airedale in ancient times, by John Nicholson (London: 1825)

Title page of Airedale in Ancient Times, by John Nicholson (2nd ed, London: 1825)

Jacquetta Hawkes was inspired by the past and nature to write many poems during the 1940s.  In particular she turned a mystic experience into a marvellous poem, Man in Time.

J.B. Priestley was not (he felt) a natural poet, but his first published book was actually a collection of what he later called “dubious verse”.

We have plenty of poetry with a Yorkshire flavour.  The Archive of Yorkshire author, John Waddington-Feather, includes work inspired by Yorkshire and the natural world.  The Rev. Waddington-Feather also donated volumes of Yorkshire dialect verse by John Hartley, Ben Turner, F.W. Moorman and more.  More local verse can be found in the Local and W.R. Mitchell book  collections, including Airedale in Ancient Times, by John Nicholson, shown above.

Reflective and campaigning verse appears throughout our peace-related archives, see for example the Archive of Adam Curle and the Papers of Sarah Meyer.

The Mitrinovic Collection includes plenty of classical and modern poetry valued by Mitrinovic and his circle, in many languages notably Greek and Serbo-Croat.  Try a Classmark search for ML/C on the library catalogue to see the poetry and other language/literature works in this collection.  I particularly like a copy of Edith Sitwell’s Bucolic Comedies which she inscribed to Mitrinovic.

The Peart-Binns Christian Socialist Archive includes material on poet, entrepeneur and pacifist Tom Heron.

Finally, an update on the Sounds of Science Poetry CompetitionSee the winner, Emily Fioccoprile, reading her poem on Youtube. The entries and publicity will be added to the University Archive soon: it is fascinating to see how the authors interpreted the idea of science and the different kinds of poems that resulted.  There is also a display in the J.B. Priestley Library of the winning poems.

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